Inside Look at WBHS Drama Academy

Raquel Ramos

Raquel Ramos and Willow Ferguson

 

      Lights, camera, action! To get an inside look at the West Boca Drama Academy we decided to interview Mr. Blank who is the head of the West Boca Performing Arts Academy. To begin the process, we went to the drama room to collect footage of him in his most comfortable environment. To really get an image of what goes into creating a production in the Theatre  academy we asked what are all the factors of putting a show together. “The hardest part is getting everything together, there’s so many moving parts…it’s a lot of running around with the cast, the crew, the sets, the lights, everything, I think organizing that is truly the hardest part.”

 

     In hopes of getting more information on the drama academy, we asked what it takes to be in the field of drama and what the  academy is all about. He was eager to respond by saying “the theater club and really just the class is all about working with people, I think that’s the biggest thing which is learning how to communicate and building relationships, also having people you can trust both on stage and in life.” Mr. Blank began to inform us about the characteristics that are a necessity for being a part of the theater academy. “You have to have perseverance and hear the word no a lot  and be able to continue on because the big word of theater is no, but it’s those people who persevere and push through who are going to be most successful.”

 

    The drama academy also has upcoming events such as the State Thespian Festival which includes almost 92 performances from our school alone; furthermore, there will be the Musical Sister Act which is from March 6th -14th. It’s clear to see that the theater academy is consistently working on productions and practicing for future performances to come. Being in the field of drama provides students the opportunity to build relationships and to receive critique from teachers such as Mr.Blank who has nearly 24 years of experience in the world of theatrics.

 

    “Don’t forget who you are, you’re still a real person no matter how big or small, it doesn’t matter if you’re on Broadway or if you are doing a small six person community theater, if you’re doing what you love and getting paid for it then you are a professional actor.” This was Mr. Blank’s advice to students who may be interested in joining the West Boca Drama Academy one day. This is also  the advice that perhaps nearly 200 drama students took that brought them closer to their dreams. Actually, couldn’t this apply to anyone who envisions themselves in drama and theater?