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The Student News Site of West Boca Raton High School

The West Boca Bullseye

The Student News Site of West Boca Raton High School

The West Boca Bullseye

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The TikTok Effect

Picture+of+drawer+filled+with+skin+care+items+in+bathroom+.+
Sara Carrus
Picture of drawer filled with skin care items in bathroom .

Kids today are now increasingly showing more interest in skincare. Now that more research is being done about the skin than older generations, the number of products available is more diverse than ever. With influencers all over TikTok and Instagram making videos of their routine, kids are more exposed to arrays of products that appeal to them. 

 

Skincare can be used in many beneficial ways like to get rid of/prevent skin conditions and enhance the appearance of skin. Everybody’s skin is unique and requires different products. However, because of trends, many use skin care products for the wrong reasons and don’t research what to use for their skin type. Because of this, the stores are full of people buying products they don’t even need, which could be going to people who need them. Teens all over TikTok talk about how different it is to walk into the stores for skin care products. Before it was a quick run, now you have to fight over products with young kids that don’t need them. 

 

There has been a controversy with younger kids using skincare for a while. But people hit their limit when Sephora started crowding with 10-year-olds. The spike of kids in Sephora started when the brand Drunk Elephant started trending on social media. Drunk Elephant is known for its cute packaging and effective products. The controversy started with this product because while this product’s packaging is obviously aimed toward younger audiences, the products aren’t sustainable for children’s skin. This brand uses high concentrations of active ingredients, like retinal and acids, and it’s not meant to be used on the developing skin. Not only can it leave the skin irritated and dry, but it can cause long-term skin damage. Parents need to stop normalizing getting their kids all these products and consider getting their kids dermatologists before allowing their kids to use all these chemicals on their skin. 

 

Sephora even has a policy that customers must be at least 13 years old to enter the store without adult supervision. This is due to safety concerns and to ensure that younger customers can make informed purchase decisions. Younger customers under 13 don’t need to develop a comprehensive skincare routine. 

 

Adolescents need to be more cautious about what they put on their skin because it is still developing and vulnerable. Kids’ hormone balances are very fragile and can easily be disrupted. Many products used today have chemicals that can be destructive to the growing skin. The chemicals that can interfere with hormones are called EDC (Endocrine-disrupting chemicals) and can be found in most personal care products. 

 

The most known(and misused) EDC is Retinol. Retinol has always been targeted towards the older crowd because of its ability to reduce wrinkles and give the skin a fresher appearance. It is not recommended to use if you have sensitive skin because of its strong effects. Although adolescents have no direct reason to want retinol, having it as part of their skincare routine has become way too normalized. Not only do younger kids buying this product not benefit from it but they could also be harming themselves. This chemical makes the underdeveloped skin even more sensitive than it already is. According to Into The Gloss, a website known for making articles on how to preserve skin health, “With repeated use, retinol products begin to thin out your skin and will eventually make you more susceptible to UVA rays which is already an issue with young skin.” Thinning of the skin can cause inflammation, burning, dryness, skin discoloration, etc. 

 

Another commonly used EDC is Paraben. This is used in many creams and makeups to preserve its shelf life. Parabens act like the hormone estrogen in the body, causing breast cells to grow and divide(both cancerous and normal). This can increase the risk of breast cancer. The disruption of the hormones alone can lead to fertility issues, weight gain, early puberty, and irregular periods. 

 

Many products are light on the skin and are mostly recommended to everyone. Cleanser is great for everyone and it is what you will use to wash your face. It is important that when you wash your face, you use a product intended for your face and not just any body wash or bar you have. If you have drier skin it’s recommended to cleanse without alcohol or fragrance. But if your skin tends to be more oily, try finding oil-free cleansers or pair it with toner. 

A toner is meant to be used right after washing your face. It can calm your face and make it softer. It can even work to get rid of red/dry patches. 

 

Moisturizer should always be used after you wash your face. It can prevent your skin from drying out and it keeps it hydrated. Some moisturizers even have SPF, which benefits all skin types. SPF can protect the skin from UVB rays. Although most moisturizers contain SPF, it’s still recommended to use sunscreen every day. If you are exposed to sunlight it’s important to reapply every 2 hours. 

 

Overall, skincare is for everyone, but not every product is for everyone. Products need to stop being turned into a trend and the use of chemicals on your skin should be used cautiously. Kids shouldn’t be putting products on their skin that they don’t need. While it’s not necessarily forbidden for a 10-year-old to shop at Sephora, it is important to consider the factors and prioritize safety regarding skincare and makeup. 

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Sara Carrus, Reporter
Hi! My name is Sara Carrus and I am a junior here at West Boca. I enjoy going on walks and watching cartoons. I'm planning on getting a degree at UCF. I’m very excited to get more involved with the school!
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